Posted in Learning Activity GRA 2

Week 10 – Shooting in Low-Light Conditions

Question 1

  1. Describe the steps that you will take to ensure that you take a high quality photograph in low light conditions. Refer to exposure, lenses, tripods, colour temperature, flash and ISO. Your answer should be a minimum of 350 words.

Question 2

  1. Watch the Lynda course Foundations of Photography: Night and Low Light by Ben Long (4h 0m)
  2. Complete the exercise files (optional)
  3. Take four low-light photographs.
    • One should be a sharp photograph that focuses on a static object, like a building or statue.
    • The second photograph should showcase moving objects, like cars or running water.
    • For the third photograph, take a moody portrait of a friend and use high ISO settings to your advantage.
    • The fourth photograph should explore using external light sources, like a Speedlite flash. (Please note, if you don’t have the equipment to take this last photograph, you may leave it out.)
Posted in Learning Activity GRA 2

Week 10 – Fun with slow shutter speeds

1. Wait until it’s almost dark outside. Take your camera and go and sit in a busy tourist area. Choose a building or statue to photograph. Place your camera on a tripod and set the shutter speed to 30 seconds or more. (If you don’t have a tripod, something stable, like a chair, will also work.)

Take a look at your photograph. Do you see a lot of people in it or just the building/statue?

2. Wait until it’s dark. Go and stand on a bridge over a busy street (or look from the window of a high-rise building). Place your camera on a tripod and set your shutter speed to 30 seconds or more. Inspect your photograph. What do you see?

3. Ask a friend to help you with this activity. Choose a dark room in your house and switch off the lights. Place your camera on a tripod and set your shutter speed to 30 seconds or more. Ask your friend to “draw” a picture in the air using a flashlight. Take a look at your photograph. What do you see? This fun activity is called light painting. Try an easy pattern first, but also a more complicated one.

Posted in Learning Activity GRA 2

Week 9 -Mastering the Art of Product Photography

Question 1

Draw up a list of the most important aspects of a product photograph. Refer to shadows, lighting, quality, ISO and editing in your answer. Mention at least five things.

  1. ISO – below 100.
  2. Quality – The photographed object should be sharp.
  3. Lighting – set white balance to sunny and make sure that there is enough light.
  4. Shadows – avoid shadow, if so very soft.
  5. Editing – Shoot in RAW so it is easier to edit it later.

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Posted in Learning Activity GRA 2

Week 7 & 8 – Front cover

Have a look at all the tasks and lessons you have done over the last few weeks. Your task now is to make a cover/a front page for your very own magazine.

  1. Go through the Graphic design history time line and choose a style and designer that you feel relates best to your personality, even has similar traits to you.
  2. Using that designer/style as inspiration, use your name or part of your name ( be creative) and create a title/name for your magazine
  3. Add your own pictures, text, illustrations, elements as well as the proper typography and titles for your cover.
  4. The expression must represent your personality. (Remember the color choice regarding this).
  5. Remember to include what kind of magazine it is, i.e.cars/bikes, fashion, design, weddings, etc.

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Week 5 & 6 – Typography

Question 1

  1. Define the term “typography” in your own words.
    Typography is the art of arranging words and letters and their relation to each other.
  2. Write a few sentences explaining what typography is not.
    Typography is not handwriting, graffiti, lettering, carving letters into stone or wood by hand, sign-writing and building letters out of matchsticks.
  3. Find a case study on typeface development on the Internet (similar to the ones in Addendum A). Explain which medium (small format printing, large format printing, mobile devices, etc.) the font developed is best suited for and why. Keep legibility, size and style in mind.
    “The Making of Magasin” by Laura Meseguer
    Magasin designed by Laura Meseguer is based on fluid handwriting typefaces.
    This font is best suited for magazine headlines, brands and packaging. The wavy shapes and handwriting style make it difficult and rather tiring for a reader for use in long paragraphs.

Question 2

  1. Document one day of your life acting as an observer of typographic design. Produce a comprehensive diary of the typographic experience of your day from first thing in the morning to last thing at night.
  2. Keep this diary within a research folder or sketchbook. You should be prepared to use photography, photocopying and other means where necessary to evidence what you find, as well as collecting first-hand examples of typographic design.
  3. Make notes or comments to reflect on what you have collected and documented. Your notes should help you to consider what kind of design it is that you are recording. For example, a cereal packet may have some large obvious lettering / typographic device on the front of the box, but there will also be typography in the form of information design within a “nutritional information” table on the packaging. So are you looking at promotional design/branding or information design? Or are you looking at typography? Is it lettering?
  4. Choose two examples of design that you have collected that you consider to have either good or bad qualities. Try to analyse these further in terms of their typography. Can you identify the typefaces being used? Does the typography communicate successfully? If so, why? If not, why not?

Question 3

  1. Complete the exercise files that came with the Lynda video Indesign Typography. Upload them to WordPress.
  2. Use your design software to design a newspaper front page. Pay special attention to typography (size, leading, column width, etc.).
    the newspaper - week 6.jpg
  3. Use your design software to design a double-page spread (DPS) for your favourite magazine. (Look at an example of a DPS here.)
Posted in Learning Activity GRA 2

Week 4 – Sketching Techniques

  1. Define, in your own words, the printmaking terms.
  2. Find examples on the Internet to represent each of those terms. 
  3. Use your graphite, eraser, eraser putty and blending stub to sketch spheres using the following techniques: hatching and cross hatching, blending, rendering, squiggly lines and cross contour lines. (Please scan your sketches and upload them to your blog.)
  4. Watch the prescribed Adobe Illustrator video on Lynda.com and complete the exercise files.
  5. Find a poem that inspires you. Follow the exercise in the lesson above and illustrate your poem.

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